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November 29th, 2012

My Kombucha Coffee!

I’m not much into cooking or making culinary master pieces. But last couple of month, my wife was into making Kombucha tea, which is a yogurt-like, probiotic drink. It’s known to enhance the digestive health and boost one’s immunity. I drink a 4~6-oz glass daily. It tastes like a mixture of tea and vinegar. There are lots of resources on the net that teaches you how to make it yourself. My favorite one is here.

I thought Kombucha tea was not challenging enough – Kombucha coffee may be more interesting. So I googled around and sure enough, there are people making Kombucha coffee. I decided to experiment with the following recipes:

  • 2 (1) quarts Freshly Brewed Plain Coffee
  • 1/2 cup (1/4 cup or 4 Tsp) Sugar
  • Kombucha Scoby (from Kombucha tea or mix in 30% volume from Kombucha tea)
  • I first fill up 70% of the 1-quart jar with the hot freshly-brewed coffee then mix in 4 Tsp of ground white sugar, then I stir/shake the jar without using any utensils to avoid any contamination with the metal. After it’s cooled to room temperature, I mix in 30% of the Kombucha tea. Since the coffee taste is much stronger than the tea, the coffee taste still dominates. One may choose to use a Kombucha scoby, then he/she may fill up to 90% of the jar. Seal the jar with a coffee filter paper and rubber band around it and just let it sit.

    In the first week of the development, the surface of the coffee looks pretty gross as if mushrooms are growing on top of it and a jelly fish floating beneath it. After two weeks or so, the scoby begins to form. The timing may vary depending on your room temperature. You’d need to keep it as warm (70F~80F) as possible.

    It takes a bit loner than usual because of the fall/winter weather. My kitchen temperature stays around 65~70F most of the time. It’s been more than 4 weeks now and my Kombucha coffee looks like below:

    Here’s a zoomed-in shot of the scoby floating on top:

    How does it taste? It tastes like a mixture of coffee and vinegar or sour coffee. I suppose I can mix the Kombucha coffee with dairy cream or soy milk to make a sour coffee latte. But I like it black. Cheers! To Health.

    Posted by Derek Tsai in Tips

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    This entry was posted on Thursday, November 29th, 2012 at 11:31 pm and is filed under Tips. You can follow any responses to this entry through the comments RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.